When We Don’t Use The Technology We Buy

If you are wondering what has killed your IT budget over the last few years you might want to look closer at whether you are using the tools you are paying for.

Anyone who knows me knows how frugal I can be. If I don’t need it, I don’t buy it. This is also why I am a late adopter because I hate acquiring things I don’t need; especially technology. 

Putting yourself into debt over technology is not justifiable for me. But what is even harder to comprehend is why organizations at an enterprise level seem willing to do the same.

I’ve heard stories of organizations spending hundreds of thousands of dollars all for a technology that never gets installed. What the heck?!

The rationale/excuses for not choosing to implement what is purchased seem to vary. “It wasn’t my idea to purchase this, therefore I won’t be installing it”, or “This was another departments idea and I find this solution too disruptive for what I need to do” or “This was purchased with government money, so it doesn’t affect us if we don’t implement this software.” 

Whatever your reason is, it’s still a waste. So when the time comes to purchase new technology for this year, consider carefully how it will benefit your organization: 

  • Will your investment allow you to increase revenues?
  • Will it allow you to reduce costs?
  • Will it enable you to serve your customers better?

If your purchased technology offers any of these benefits, USE IT! And don’t complain about it.

Because if technology is not providing you with increased revenues, or driving down the costs of your business, what’s the point?

Kelly Batke

Kelly is the self-confessed technology laggard who works in technology. The good news is she is slowly reaching late adopter status. Kelly enjoys learning and writing about the psychology behind technology—as in why do we buy what we buy, and how does that impact our environment?