Guilted Into Technology?

Unlike most of you, I am a complete laggard when it comes to purchasing technology. In other words, I am usually the last person to adopt any new device or gadget.

Yes, the picture of the laptop is really mine. It’s slow, a little clunky, and is held together by some packing tape and a wad of tissues to support one corner. It also needs to be propped up against something for the screen to display properly. I currently have it propped up against a bowl of fruit.

Why do I keep this piece of junk? Because it still works.

Unless my current technology is broken, I refuse to buy anything new. And when I do finally purchase something new, I often feel somewhat guilted into it. You can’t imagine the heckling I get about my laptop. Or maybe you can. Like, I said I am a total laggard.

When it comes to technology purchases, the majority of people don’t fall into this category. In other words they purchase tech gadgets way ahead of me. Here are a list of classifications of other purchasers:

Innovators: Risk takers who are generally young. Their wallet can afford failures. These are the dudes who camp out when Apple releases a new product.

Early adopters: Opinion leaders who carefully try out new ideas and gadgets. This is most of the people I work with.

Early majority: They accept more change than the average person, but are still cautious. This group loves testimonials.

Late majority: Will try technology only after it has proven its place in the market. They are followers who approach an innovation with a high degree of skepticism.

Laggard: As mentioned, this is me. If you are still confused, I defer to the picture above.

Where do you fit in?

One final note, I may be a laggard when it comes to technology, but I am definitely NOT a laggard when it comes to fashion.

Kelly Batke

Kelly is the self-confessed technology laggard who works in technology. The good news is she is slowly reaching late adopter status. Kelly enjoys learning and writing about the psychology behind technology—as in why do we buy what we buy, and how does that impact our environment?