Are Your Files At Risk For A Cyber Transmitted Disease?

Recently Dropbox admitted that a programming error led to a temporary security breach. For about four hours users were allowed “password free” access before the error was discovered.  Yikes!  Only less than 1 percent of accounts were affected and it took only 5 minutes to fix.

I love Dropbox – it’s definitely a great alternative to using sites like TransferBIGFiles.com. In my case it’s better than begging IT to give you access to the FTP site all the time to upload.

Nowadays large files are common, especially if they’re non-compressed videos files. Cloud based email like Gmail allow for a max of 25MB for attachments but sometimes even that’s not enough. Dropbox allows you to share big files without pressing the send button or bugging IT. The best part is you get 2GB of space for free!

When security breaches happen though, this opens the door for hackers to get in and share their spyware, malware and viruses too. You don’t want your easily sharable files to catch a CTD (Cyber-Transmitted Disease).

The moral of the story—wear computer protection! You can prevent infection.

Here are some tips to help prevent your Dropbox files from getting a CTD:

  • Change your password every month
  • Know who you’re sharing your folders with—especially if the content is private
  • Use the sharing options and settings (set visibility and restrictions)
  • Most importantly, make sure you have strong security software installed on your work computer before sharing or uploading remote files

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Cesar Bohorquez

Cesar would rather DO than observe. Observing wastes too much time. He spends his time learning about cultures, religions, traditions and society as a whole.