Are We Setting Students Up To Be Unproductive?

A recent survey showed that university students would rather have high speed internet and good networking service than functioning bathrooms.
 
With high demand for Internet, universities feel compelled to comply. The University of California plans on expanding their bandwidth from 650 mbps to 800 mbps. This number will increase as the student population of the university expands. Campuses are trying to imitate the feel of living at home, and also to seem more appealing than off-campus housing.
 
As a student myself, I understand that Internet has become a crucial part of academic life. Lecture notes, videos, and even lecture recordings can all be found online, so good Internet connection is now essential to classroom success.
 
But when we allow computers into the classroom, we open the doors to a whole new level of procrastination. I recall maybe 6 or 7 computers out of 20 or 30 in a classroom were actually used for note taking. The others are used for Facebook, Twitter, and online video. I can’t tell you how many times I missed out on lecture notes because I was busy watching Family Guy, or a YouTube video.
 
It is interesting that at the same time as all of this, the GPA requirement to get into universities are rising. Perhaps we shouldn’t blame schools entirely for distracting students from their studies. After all, we are adults now, and we don’t answer to anyone but ourselves! So, we can also be responsible for our own Internet activity.

Nimritta Parmar

Nimritta is a third year student at Simon Fraser University, studying English and Communications. She's a Facebook rat (AKA master procrastinator), and being a student for the last 16 years of her life means that she has education on the brain! (perhaps you've noticed?)